Greyhound Handicapping - What Do You Expect?

Even at the greyhound track, things move fast nowadays. No one wants to wait for anything. If there's a line, the people in it are jostling each other and fidgeting from foot to foot, anxious for their turn.

If there's a glitch in the computers that run the track machinery, so that the races get held up for a few minutes, the crowd is agitated and vocal about how this is really messing up their day. No one wants to wait one second more than they really have to, even when it comes to winning.

A dog player buys a system, gives it a quick look and then dashes off to the track to try it out. Instead of making some paper bets, like the system says to do, he just puts down bets for real without even reading the whole thing or making some practice runs on old programs.

No surprisingly, this often results in losing tickets and a very frustrated handicapper. How much better it would have been if the dog player had tried out the system, gotten used to using it, and then taken it to the track. No matter how much we'd like everything to be "instant", sometimes it takes time to learn new things.

Sometimes, we have to accept that we're not going to be able to get instant gratification. Waiting is something that we try to teach our two-year olds, so why is it that we have such a problem with it also? After all, we should have learned by now that it takes time to get things right.

We also should have learned that it's worth waiting and working on something for awhile, if it pays off in financial gain. That's what systems do. The smart bettor learns to use them over a period of time, then when he's mastered them, he uses them to make money, time after time.

It's not "instant", but it's lasting, and that's more important than "instant". Taking your time and tweaking a good system to make it better, is the best way to make money at the dog track.