5 Helpful Tips For When It Is Time To Encapsulate Your Crawl Space

Encapsulating a crawl space is a common way to deal with moisture or flooding. It is also an easy way to quickly get control of the air quality in the home and lock out rodents and insects. When you're thinking about "green-ovating" your home, or simply getting control of the moisture or humidity, when you have a crawl space, you must encapsulate.

Encapsulation does a great deal for the crawlspace and for the home above.

What the process is and what it does

The practice of encapsulating or "sealing off" a crawlspace is done to lock out moisture and cut off the connection between moisture, water and the joists of a home. By running a vapor barrier down the walls of a crawlspace to completely cover the floor, you essential separate the outside from the inside of the home.

This vapor barrier will be the flexible membrane between the walls and floor and the rest of the home. A properly designed vapor barrier will limit the transfer of moisture through it, while regulating the speed at which air will naturally pass through. This helps to limit and control the amount of moisture that will find its way into the air space and completely segregate liquid water and direct it to a sump location.

5 helpful tips when having a Vapor Barrier installed in your crawlspace:

1.) Not all vapor barriers are made for this task - careful. There are many products out in the world that claim to be able to fully encapsulate a crawl space. Make sure that your vapor barrier has a low "perm" rate and that it is at least 14mil thick. If you're planning to use the space for storage make sure that a flexible sub-flooring product is also placed on top of the vapor barrier to protect it.

2.) Cover the walls too - all too often contractors forget to also encapsulate the walls of the crawl space when installing a vapor barrier. This can still allow water and moisture into the basement and therefore render the whole project useless. Take care to make sure it's installed properly.

3.) Don't use sprays. - Sealants and sprays aren't designed to be applied on the interior of the basement. They are good in many circumstances as the "first line of defense" but as the last, they can't hold the pressure and moisture trapped in a wall.

4.) Install a sump and a dehumidifier - to totally control the moisture level in the crawl space it's imperative that you have a sump pump and a dehumidifier installed. Moisture will still exist, although not to dangerous levels, but a sump will remove any liquid water your encapsulation traps, and the dehumidifier will deal with any residual moisture that naturally collects in the space.

5.) Look for the right contractor - many of the contractors who specialize in this repair are also in the basement waterproofing business. These contractors, over other general contractors, are preferred because they'll have access to more robust and dependable solutions. They also have the proper training and experience to pull the project off with little effort on your part.

Encapsulating a crawl space will limit moisture and humidity in your cellar and help lower your energy costs. Limiting moisture will help to ensure that any insulation in your floor boards will be working at their peak while keeping the cost of running any air conditioning units to a bare minimum.