Cheese And Wine Go Together Anytime

Wine and cheese go together like love and romance. A gathering of friends, a sampling of cheese and a bottle of wine can be enjoyed in every season and on every occasion.

Wine and cheese make the perfect start to a casual get together with friends and family. To make the evening special set the mood with a touch of candle light and graceful wine glasses. Plastic glasses ruin the taste and atmosphere. Also avoid the huge wine glasses that seem to hold a whole bottle of wine. Wine is made to be sipped not chugged. Serve the cheese on a wooden cutting board and invest in a cheese knife. Remove the cheese from the refrigerator at least one hour before serving. Do not arrange the mild and strong cheese together on the same cutting board to keep each cheeses flavor unique. A tray of grapes, sliced apples and figs can be used as a center piece and the fruit is the perfect way to clean the palette between wines.

A mouth-watering selection of richly flavored cheeses enhanced with a thoughtfully selected array of wines can showcase each other. The wide range of flavors and intensities in both can turn anyone's innocent attempt at match-making into a wildly hit-or-miss affair. There is nothing sacred about the following guidelines, just some hints to get you started on your own tasting adventure. After all, the point is to enjoy!

Here are four practical tips for your maximum enjoyment:

Temperature
1) Serve white wines chilled, red at about 65 degrees, and cheeses at room temperature.

2) Don't Distract from the Flavor
Avoid bread or crackers with assertive flavors; for example, caraway rye. French bread, french baguettes or light crackers are best.

3) Don't Drink Wine with Cheese
Wait until the taste is set up, then sip.

4) A Rule of Thumb
Consider the origin of the cheese and select a like wine. For example, a Swiss Emanthal cheese with a light white mountain wine.

Although there are exceptions to every rule, here are a few tried and true maxims that should make choosing the correct wine a little easier.

  • Young wines served before old wines.
  • Dry wines served before sweet wines.
  • White wines served before red wines.
Here are some combinations of cheese and wine to help you get started.
  • Brie - Light Reds (Beaujolais)
  • Camembert - White Dry (Orvieto, Soave)
  • Gruyere, Cheddar & Port Salut - Crisp White (Sauvignon Blanc, White Burgundy, Chardonnay)
  • Chevre - Course Red (Zinfandels, Pinots)
  • Roquefort, Gorgonzola, Bleus - Full Velvety Red (Burgundy, Cabernet)
  • Brie, Petit Suisse - Dessert Style Champagne
  • Stilton - Aged Port